UMD CMNS Physics S1 Color

PhysCon 2016 Travel Award Recipients

Travel Awards in the amount of $200 were provided to help fund SPS members presenting their research interests and outreach activities at PhysCon 2016. Six of these awards are recipients from UMD.

CMTC to kick off annual research symposium

cmtc pictureThis week, the Condensed Matter Theory Center hosts its annual symposium, which brings attendees up to speed on the Center's latest research interests. The symposium, which features 11 technical talks spanning two days, begins Dec. 7 and is open to all.

This year's talks cover a range of topics in condensed matter theory, reflecting the diverse interests of CMTC faculty, postdocs and students. These include Weyl semimetals, many-body localization and Majorana fermions—particles that played a leading role in a workshop that CMTC hosted at the end of October.

"CMTC wants to work on the most exciting frontier topics in the field because that's what excites and enthuses the young researchers," says Sankar Das Sarma, the director of CMTC and a JQI Fellow. CMTC, which has held a symposium every year since 2006, invites all of its members to present their latest work, provided that the results have been written up in a research paper.

The symposium follows on the heels of CMTC's October Majorana workshop, which brought together nearly 40 experts on the physics of certain semiconductor-superconductor junctions. Attendees critically examined the experimental evidence for Majorana quasiparticles at the ends of nanowires in such systems, concluding that no other explanation of experimental results seems consistent. The quasiparticles predicted to live in these systems could be useful for building a future quantum computer. Das Sarma says that the workshop was a success and hopes that CMTC can host a similar meeting in future years.

Related articles from the Joint Quantum Institute:

A warm welcome for Weyl physics
Disorder grants a memory to quantum spins
Novel gate may enhance power of Majorana-based quantum computers

Scientists are close to building a quantum computer that can beat a conventional one

It's a Sunday afternoon in September, and the two co-founders of ionQ, a quantum computing startup, are meeting for a strategy session with their first hire: their new CEO. Sitting in comfy leather chairs in the Physical Sciences Complex at the University of Maryland (UMD) in College Park, the two founders are experiencing a touch of culture clash. Lifelong research scientists, UMD physicist Chris Monroe and Jungsang Kim, an electrical engineer at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, are relaxed and talkative about their company's plans, even in the presence of a reporter. They tick off reasons why trapped ions, their specialty, will make for a great quantum computer—perfect reproducibility, long lifetimes, and good controllability with lasers.

Das Sarma Receives Third Consecutive Honor as Influential Researcher

For the third year running, JQI Fellow and Distinguished University Professor of Physics Sankar Das Sarma has been identified as a Highly Cited Researcher. The annual distinction, previously compiled by Thomson Reuters IP & Science and now assembled by Clarivate Analytics, honors scientists who publish extensively and whose citation counts rank in the top 1 percent in a given year and field.

Das Sarma, who is also the director of the Condensed Matter Theory Center at UMD, studies everything from exotic low-temperature materials to robust ways of building and operating future quantum computers. He has been regularly recognized for his prolific publication record, with similar honors dating back to 2001.

A physics faculty member at UMD since 1980, Das Sarma received his undergraduate degree in physics in 1973 from Presidency College in Kolkata, India and his Ph.D. in theoretical physics in 1979 from Brown University.

UMD, Italy & MoonEx Join to Put New Laser-Reflecting Arrays on Moon

The University of Maryland, The National Laboratories of Frascati, Italy, and Moon Express (MoonEx), a leading contender in the Google Lunar X Prize competition, recently announced they will deliver a new set of lunar laser ranging arrays to the Moon over a series of missions that are anticipated to begin in 2017.