• Research News

    Narrow Glass Threads Synchronize the Light Emissions of Distant Atoms

    If you holler at someone across your yard, the sound travels on the bustling movement of air molecules. But over long distances your voice needs help to reach its destination—help provided by a telephone or the Internet. Atoms don’t yell, but they can share Read More
  • Research News

    Quantum Simulators Wield Control Over More Than 50 Qubits, Setting New Record

    Two independent teams of scientists, including one from the Joint Quantum Institute, have used more than 50 interacting atomic qubits to mimic magnetic quantum matter, blowing past the complexity of previous demonstrations. The results appear in this week’s issue of Nature. As the basis Read More
  • Research News

    High-altitude Observatory Sheds Light on Origin of Excess Anti-matter

    UMD-led HAWC collaboration suggests dark matter as possible culprit A mountaintop observatory in Mexico, built and operated by an international team of scientists, has captured the first wide-angle view of gamma rays emanating from two rapidly spinning stars. The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory Read More
  • Research News

    Neutron Star Merger Directly Observed for the First Time

    On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars—the dense, collapsed cores that remain after large stars die in a supernova explosion. The merger is the first cosmological event observed in both gravitational Read More
  • Research News

    Gravitational Waves Detected a Fourth Time

    On August 14, 2017, at 10:30:43 UTC, scientists observed gravitational waves—ripples in the fabric of spacetime—for the fourth time. The twin Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors—located in Livingston, Louisiana, and Hanford, Washington—detected the gravitational wave event, named GW170814.  Read More
  • Research News

    Turning Ions into Quantum Cats

    In Schrödinger's famous thought experiment, a cat seems to be both dead and alive—an idea that strains credulity. These days, cats still don't act this way, but physicists now regularly create analogues of Schrödinger's cat in the lab by smearing the microscopic quantum world Read More
  • Research News

    Sensing Atoms Caught in Ripples of Light

    Optical fibers are ubiquitous, carrying light wherever it is needed. These glass tunnels are the high-speed railway of information transit, moving data at incredible speeds over tremendous distances. Read More
  • Research News

    Space-based Experiment Will Tackle the Mysteries of Cosmic Rays

    On August 14, 2017, a groundbreaking University of Maryland-designed cosmic ray detector will travel to the International Space Station (ISS) aboard the SpaceX-12 Commercial Resupply Service mission. The instrument, named ISS Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass (ISS-CREAM), is roughly the size of a refrigerator and Read More
  • Research News

    Simulating the Quantum World with Electron Traps

    Quantum behavior plays a crucial role in novel and emergent material properties, such as superconductivity and magnetism. Unfortunately, it is still impossible to calculate the underlying quantum behavior, let alone fully understand it. Scientists of QuTech, the Kavli Institute of Nanoscience in Delft and Read More
  • 1 Narrow Glass Threads Synchronize the Light Emissions of Distant Atoms
  • 2 Quantum Simulators Wield Control Over More Than 50 Qubits, Setting New Record
  • 3 High-altitude Observatory Sheds Light on Origin of Excess Anti-matter
  • 4 Neutron Star Merger Directly Observed for the First Time
  • 5 Gravitational Waves Detected a Fourth Time
  • 6 Turning Ions into Quantum Cats
  • 7 Sensing Atoms Caught in Ripples of Light
  • 8 Space-based Experiment Will Tackle the Mysteries of Cosmic Rays
  • 9 Simulating the Quantum World with Electron Traps
  • Outreach
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Department News

  • Jan 16, 2018 Four College Faculty Members Named 2017 Highly Cited Researchers Published works by Sankar Das Sarma, Ian Spielman, Jacob Taylor and Dennis vanEngelsdorp have consistently been judged by their peers to be of particular use and significanceFour faculty members in the University of Maryland’s College of Computer, Mathematical, and Natural Sciences are included on Clarivate Read More
  • Jan 4, 2018 John W. Layman, 1933 - 2017 Noted physics educator John W. Layman, who held a joint appointment in Physics and the Department of Education until his retirement in 1998, died on December 30, 2017. He was 84. Prof. Layman, an Illinois native, received an undergraduate degree from Park College in Missouri Read More
  • Dec 19, 2017 Professor Alessandra Buonanno Awarded the Leibniz Prize The DFG announced today that Professor Alessandra Buonanno will be honoured with the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz prize for her key role in the first direct observations of gravitational waves. This long-awaited discovery is a historic scientific milestone, and was awarded this year’s Nobel prize in Read More
  • Dec 14, 2017 UMD Associated Research Included in Physics World Top Ten Breakthroughs of 2017 Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) tops the charts for the 2017 Breakthrough of the Year with Physics World with the first multimessenger observation of a neutron-star merger.  UMD Professors Alessandra Buonanno and Peter Shawhan are both collaborators with LIGO and have contributed to the detection of the fourth Read More
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Upcoming Events

Jan
26

Fri, Jan 26, 2018 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Jan
26

Fri, Jan 26, 2018 4:00 pm - 5:15 pm

Jan
29

Mon, Jan 29, 2018 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Slawsky Clinic

1214 Physics Building
301.405.5984

Fall & Spring Sememster Hours: 10 am to 3 pm, M-F

The Slawsky Clinic has been helping students since the mid-1970s. The Physics Department and Milton and Zaka Slawsky established the clinic in 1975. Milton and Zaka were identical twin brothers with PhDs in physics. After they retired, they contacted the Physics Department looking for a way to volunteer their services. This resulted in the Mollie and Simon Slawsky Memorial Tutoring Clinic for Physics, named for their parents.

The grades in physics depend largely on the student’s ability to solve problems. In order to get good grades in the physics course, the student must be able to get a reasonable solution to a reasonable problem in about 15 minutes. This is the average time you have in an exam or a quiz. This means that knowing the subject matter is necessary but it is not enough. You must learn a systematic efficient strategy in order to use the knowledge with speed and accuracy. The clinic helps you develop a strategy and with supportive supervision trains you to improve your ability and confidence.

The Slawsky Clinic provides physics tutoring for students on a walk-in, first-come, first-served basis. The clinic operates primarily for the 100 and 200 level physics classes. The tutors can answer additional physics questions as their time and knowledge permit. The tutors are retired professors, scientists, and engineers.