• Research News

    High-altitude Observatory Sheds Light on Origin of Excess Anti-matter

    UMD-led HAWC collaboration suggests dark matter as possible culprit A mountaintop observatory in Mexico, built and operated by an international team of scientists, has captured the first wide-angle view of gamma rays emanating from two rapidly spinning stars. The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory Read More
  • Research News

    Neutron Star Merger Directly Observed for the First Time

    On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars—the dense, collapsed cores that remain after large stars die in a supernova explosion. The merger is the first cosmological event observed in both gravitational Read More
  • Research News

    Gravitational Waves Detected a Fourth Time

    On August 14, 2017, at 10:30:43 UTC, scientists observed gravitational waves—ripples in the fabric of spacetime—for the fourth time. The twin Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors—located in Livingston, Louisiana, and Hanford, Washington—detected the gravitational wave event, named GW170814.  Read More
  • Research News

    Turning Ions into Quantum Cats

    In Schrödinger's famous thought experiment, a cat seems to be both dead and alive—an idea that strains credulity. These days, cats still don't act this way, but physicists now regularly create analogues of Schrödinger's cat in the lab by smearing the microscopic quantum world Read More
  • Research News

    Sensing Atoms Caught in Ripples of Light

    Optical fibers are ubiquitous, carrying light wherever it is needed. These glass tunnels are the high-speed railway of information transit, moving data at incredible speeds over tremendous distances. Read More
  • Research News

    Space-based Experiment Will Tackle the Mysteries of Cosmic Rays

    On August 14, 2017, a groundbreaking University of Maryland-designed cosmic ray detector will travel to the International Space Station (ISS) aboard the SpaceX-12 Commercial Resupply Service mission. The instrument, named ISS Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass (ISS-CREAM), is roughly the size of a refrigerator and Read More
  • Research News

    Simulating the Quantum World with Electron Traps

    Quantum behavior plays a crucial role in novel and emergent material properties, such as superconductivity and magnetism. Unfortunately, it is still impossible to calculate the underlying quantum behavior, let alone fully understand it. Scientists of QuTech, the Kavli Institute of Nanoscience in Delft and Read More
  • Research News

    Proposed LHC Experiment Would Spot Invisible, Long-lived Particles

    More than 300 feet underground, looping underneath both France and Switzerland on the outskirts of Geneva, a 16-mile-long ring called the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) smashes protons together at nearly the speed of light. Sifting through the wreckage, scientists have made some profound discoveries Read More
  • Research News

    Atomic cousins team up in early quantum networking node

    Large-scale quantum computers, which are an active pursuit of many university labs and tech giants, remain years away. But that hasn’t stopped some scientists from thinking ahead, to a time when quantum computers might be linked together in a network or a single quantum Read More
  • 1 High-altitude Observatory Sheds Light on Origin of Excess Anti-matter
  • 2 Neutron Star Merger Directly Observed for the First Time
  • 3 Gravitational Waves Detected a Fourth Time
  • 4 Turning Ions into Quantum Cats
  • 5 Sensing Atoms Caught in Ripples of Light
  • 6 Space-based Experiment Will Tackle the Mysteries of Cosmic Rays
  • 7 Simulating the Quantum World with Electron Traps
  • 8 Proposed LHC Experiment Would Spot Invisible, Long-lived Particles
  • 9 Atomic cousins team up in early quantum networking node
  • Outreach
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Department News

  • Nov 8, 2017 Congressional hearing highlights need for quantum technology initiative On October 24, 2017, two Fellows of the Joint Quantum Institute and the Joint Center for Quantum Information and Computer Science were among those that testified during a joint congressional committee hearing on the topic of American Leadership in Quantum Technology. Carl Williams and Christopher Read More
  • Oct 27, 2017 Ravi Kuchimanchi Awarded Sakharov Prize Alumnus Ravi Kuchimanchi (Ph.D., 1995) has been awarded the 2018 Andrei Sakharov Prize of the American Physical Society "for his continued research in physics while simultaneously advocating for global policies that reflect science; for leading sustainable development, human rights, and social justice efforts; and for Read More
  • Oct 12, 2017 Five UMD Physicists Elected APS Fellows Michelle Girvan, Wolfgang Losert, Johnpierre Paglione, Edo Waks and Jake Taylor have been elected Fellows of the American Physical Society. Prof. Girvan was cited for seminal contributions to the nonlinear and statistical physics of complex networks, including characterization of network structures and dynamics, and interdisciplinary applications. She received Read More
  • Oct 3, 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics Awarded to Gravitational Wave Pioneers On October 3, 2017, the Nobel Committee for Physics announced the 2017 laureates for the 2017 Nobel Prize in physics. Read More
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Upcoming Events

Nov
20

Mon, Nov 20, 2017 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Nov
20

Mon, Nov 20, 2017 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Nov
20

Mon, Nov 20, 2017 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm

Nov
21

Tue, Nov 21, 2017 11:00 am - 12:15 pm

Nov
21

Tue, Nov 21, 2017 1:15 pm - 2:15 pm

Slawsky Clinic

1214 Physics Building
301.405.5984

Fall & Spring Sememster Hours: 10 am to 3 pm, M-F

The Slawsky Clinic has been helping students since the mid-1970s. The Physics Department and Milton and Zaka Slawsky established the clinic in 1975. Milton and Zaka were identical twin brothers with PhDs in physics. After they retired, they contacted the Physics Department looking for a way to volunteer their services. This resulted in the Mollie and Simon Slawsky Memorial Tutoring Clinic for Physics, named for their parents.

The grades in physics depend largely on the student’s ability to solve problems. In order to get good grades in the physics course, the student must be able to get a reasonable solution to a reasonable problem in about 15 minutes. This is the average time you have in an exam or a quiz. This means that knowing the subject matter is necessary but it is not enough. You must learn a systematic efficient strategy in order to use the knowledge with speed and accuracy. The clinic helps you develop a strategy and with supportive supervision trains you to improve your ability and confidence.

The Slawsky Clinic provides physics tutoring for students on a walk-in, first-come, first-served basis. The clinic operates primarily for the 100 and 200 level physics classes. The tutors can answer additional physics questions as their time and knowledge permit. The tutors are retired professors, scientists, and engineers.