News

Professor Paglione Awarded Materials Synthesis Investigator Award

Johnpierre Paglione is among 12 scientist nationwide to be awarded a Materials Synthesis Investigator Award, by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, in support of research aimed at discovering novel quantum materials through a combination of exploratory synthesis, high-throughput semi-automated synthesis and data mining. The program is part of the Emergent Phenomena in Quantum Systems initiative, which enables investigators to dedicate substantial effort to discovery-driven research, such as investigative synthesis of new types of quantum materials.

Professor Paglione is a condensed matter experimentalist and a member of the Center for Nanophysics and Advanced Materials (CNAM). His research interests include cuprate and iron-based superconductivity and magnetism, quantum criticality and strongly correlated electron phenomena, and the new field of topological insulator research.

For more information, vist: http://ter.ps/6va

Johnpierre Paglione

Research

New UMD Synthesis Method May Shape Future of Nanostructures, Clean Energy

New UMD Synthesis Method May Shape Future of Nanostructures, Clean Energy

A team of UMD physicists has published new nanoscience advances that they and other scientists say make possible new nanostructures and nanotechnologies with huge potential applications ranging from clean energy and quantum computing advances to new sensor development.

Published in the September 2 issue of Nature Communications, the Maryland scientists' primary discovery is a fundamentally new synthesis strategy for hybrid nanostructures that uses a connector, or "intermedium," nanoparticle to join multiple different nanoparticles into nanostructures that would be very difficult or perhaps even impossible to make with existing methods.

The resultant mix and match modular component approach avoids the limitations in material choice and nanostructure size, shape and symmetry that are inherent in the crystalline growth (epitaxial) synthesis approaches currently used to build nanostructures.

Read More

Department of Physics


University of Maryland
College Park, MD 20742-4111
Phone: 301.405.3401
Fax: 301.314.9525