Research

Creating Optical Cables Out of Thin Air

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Imagine being able to instantaneously run an optical cable or fiber to any point on earth, or even into space. That’s what Howard Milchberg, professor of physics and electrical and computer engineering at the University of Maryland, wants to do.

In a paper published in the July 2014 issue of the journal Optica, Milchberg and his lab report using an “air waveguide” to enhance light signals collected from distant sources. These air waveguides could have many applications, including long-range laser communications, detecting pollution in the atmosphere, making high-resolution topographic maps and laser weapons.

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Research

Making Quantum Connections

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In quantum mechanics, interactions between particles can give rise to entanglement, which is a strange type of connection that could never be described by a non-quantum, classical theory. These connections, called quantum correlations, are present in entangled systems even if the objects are not physically linked (with wires, for example). Entanglement is at the heart of what distinguishes purely quantum systems from classical ones; it is why they are potentially useful, but it sometimes makes them very difficult to understand.

Physicists are pretty adept at controlling quantum systems and even making certain entangled states. Now researchers, led by theorist Alexey Gorshkov and experimentalist Christopher Monroe, are putting these skills to work to explore the dynamics of correlated quantum systems. Their recent results investigating how information flows through a quantum many-body system are published this week in the journal Nature (10.1038/nature13450), and in a second paper to appear in Physical Review Letters.

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Awards

Professor Eno Named UMD Distinguished Scholar-Teacher

Sarah Eno
Sarah Eno

Sarah Eno has been named a University of Maryland Distinguished Scholar-Teacher. Sarah is a brilliant physicist and a devoted educator who has served for the last two years as our Associate Chair for Graduate Education. She has always been extremely concerned about our education efforts, and a few years ago took the inititative to establish a physics lab staffed mostly by undergraduates, teaching them how to build and operate photodetectors and giving them priceless "real-world" experience.

As a researcher on the CMS experiment at CERN's LHC, Sarah is one of the most accomplished people in the field of particle physics. She has a really amazing ability to analyze data and understands hardware deeply.

She will give her Distinguished Lecture on Tuesday, November 4, 2014 at 4PM in the Physics lecture hall.

Department of Physics


University of Maryland
College Park, MD 20742-4111
Phone: 301.405.3401
Fax: 301.314.9525