F1.largeUMD physics professors Christopher Monroe and Jake Taylor, together with Michael Raymer of the University of Oregon, published an article on the National Quantum Initiative (NQI) in the May 3 issue of Science. The NQI Act, which was signed into law on December 21, 2018, lays out a plan for the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the National Science Foundation, and the Department of Energy to work with academia and industry to further grow the quantum information science and technology (QIST) sector. Earlier this year, Monroe and Raymer wrote an article on the NQI for the February 2019 issue of Quantum Science and Technology, which details some of the events that ultimately led to this law.

The new article describes how the NQI aims to enable a so-called QIST ecosystem to study and overcome scientific challenges in this area, as well as build up a workforce educated in quantum science. Some of the possible outcomes of the NQI could include improved sensors, universally programmable quantum computers, and a more secure global communication network. The article also briefly summarizes possible risks associated with quantum research and development, including possible failure modes of the technology, as well as unforeseen ethical questions.

Monroe is the Bice-Seci Zorn Professor of Physics, a Distinguished University Professor, Fellow of the Joint Quantum Institute (JQI) and the Joint Center for Quantum Information and Computer Science (QuICS). He also co-founded the quantum computing company IonQ. Monroe previously advocated for a NQI through the National Photonics Initiative and testified before a joint congressional committee hearing on the topic of American Leadership in Quantum Technology in 2017. A second JQI and QuICS Fellow Carl Williams, who is Acting Director of the Physical Measurement Laboratory at NIST, provided expert testimony to congress at that same hearing.

Taylor is an adjunct professor in the Department of Physics, Co-Director of the Joint Center for Quantum Information and Computer Science and Fellow of the Joint Quantum Institute and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. He is also the Assistant Director for Quantum Information Science at the Office of Science and Technology Policy and was recently named the Interim Director for the National Quantum Coordination Office, which was established as part of the NQI.

Raymer is a Knight Professor of Liberal Arts and Sciences of the Oregon Center for Optical, Molecular and Quantum Science at the University of Oregon. Raymer has also been a strong advocate for developing a national strategy around QIST.