UMD CMNS Physics S1 Color

  • Research News

    Destabilized solitons perform a disappearing act

    When your heart beats, blood courses through your veins in waves of pressure. These pressure waves manifest as your pulse, a regular rhythm unperturbed by the complex internal structure of the body. Scientists call such robust waves solitons, and in many ways they behave Read More
  • Research News

    Crossing the quantum-chaotic divide

    Chaos is all around us, a fact that weather forecasters know all too well. Their job is notoriously difficult because small changes in air pressure or temperature, which ultimately drive winds and weather systems, can have huge consequences on a global scale. This sensitivity Read More
  • Research News

    Stacked nanocrystals offer a new twist on handedness

    Chirality is another name for the asymmetry that we see between our left and right hands. This handedness crops up nearly everywhere in nature, from galaxy spirals down to the quantum mechanical properties of fundamental particles. Life itself boasts some of the most well-studied Read More
  • Research News

    As dark matter eludes scientists, they plan a more extensive search

    For decades, scientists have suspected that the universe contains more matter than we can see.  They point to clues in the cosmos, such as irregularities in the radiation left over from the early universe and the way light bends around galaxies. By studying the Read More
  • Research News

    Paik's Work Cited as 2016 Highlight

    Research Professor and Professor Emeritus Ho Jung Paik is the lead author of the article "Low-frequency terrestrial tensor gravitational-wave detector," which has been selected by the journal Classical and Quantum Gravity as one of their highlights of 2016. Postdoctoral associate Cornelius Griggs and research Read More
  • Research News

    Probe for nanofibers has atom-scale sensitivity

    Optical fibers are the backbone of modern communications, shuttling information from A to B through thin glass filaments as pulses of light. They are used extensively in telecommunications, allowing information to travel at near the speed of light virtually without loss. Read More
  • Research News

    Physics - Synopsis: Chemical Echo

    Echoes are not limited to sound reflecting off cave walls. A similar phenomenon—a delayed response following an immediate response to some stimulus—can occur after coupled oscillators are stimulated by a sequence of two input pulses. Researchers have now observed such an echo phenomenon in Read More
  • Research News

    A Warm Welcome for Weyl Physics

    This is part one of a two-part series on Weyl semimetals and Weyl fermions, newly discovered materials and particles that have drawn great interest from researchers at JQI and the Condensed Matter Theory Center at the University of Maryland. The first part focuses on Read More
  • Research News

    Physics Nobel honors underpinnings of exotic matter

      A trio of researchers who laid the foundation for understanding numerous exotic phases of matter have split the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physics. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awarded the prize "for theoretical discoveries of topological phase transitions and topological phases of Read More
  • 1 Destabilized solitons perform a disappearing act
  • 2 Crossing the quantum-chaotic divide
  • 3 Stacked nanocrystals offer a new twist on handedness
  • 4 As dark matter eludes scientists, they plan a more extensive search
  • 5 Paik's Work Cited as 2016 Highlight
  • 6 Probe for nanofibers has atom-scale sensitivity
  • 7 Physics - Synopsis: Chemical Echo
  • 8 A Warm Welcome for Weyl Physics
  • 9 Physics Nobel honors underpinnings of exotic matter
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