• Research News

    Bilayer Graphene Inspires Two-Universe Cosmological Model

    Physicists sometimes come up with crazy stories that sound like science fiction. Some turn out to be true, like how the curvature of space and time described by Einstein was eventually borne out by astronomical measurements. Others linger on as mere possibilities or mathematical Read More
  • Research News

    New Perspective Blends Quantum and Classical to Understand Quantum Rates of Change

    There is nothing permanent except change. This is perhaps never truer than in the fickle and fluctuating world of quantum mechanics. The quantum world is in constant flux. The properties of quantum particles flit between discrete, quantized states without any possibility of ever being Read More
  • Research News

    Tug-of-War Unlocks Menagerie of Quantum Phases of Matter

    Phases are integral to how we define our world. We navigate through the phases of our lives, from child to teenager to adult, chaperoned along the way by our changing traits and behaviors. Nature, too, undergoes phase changes. Lakes can freeze for the winter, Read More
  • Research News

    Enhancing Simulations of Curved Space with Qubits

    One of the mind-bending ideas that physicists and mathematicians have come up with is that space itself—not just objects in space—can be curved. When space curves (as happens dramatically near a black hole), sizes and directions defy normal intuition. Something as straightforward as defining Read More
  • Research News

    In a Smooth Move, Ions Ditch Disorder and Keep Their Memories

    A Persian adage, notably wielded by Abe Lincoln(link is external) and the band OK Go(link is external), expresses the ephemeral nature of the world: “This, too, shall pass.” Physicists have their own version of this rule. It says that wiggles and wrinkles—really any small Read More
  • Research News

    Graphene’s Magic Act Relies on a Small Twist

    Carbon is not the shiniest element, nor the most reactive, nor the rarest. But it is one of the most versatile. Carbon is the backbone of life on earth and the fossil fuels that have resulted from the demise of ancient life. Carbon is Read More
  • Research News

    Novel Design May Boost Efficiency of On-Chip Frequency Combs

    On the cover of the Pink Floyd album Dark Side of the Moon, a prism splits a ray of light into all the colors of the rainbow. This multicolored medley, which owes its emergence to the fact that light travels as a wave, is Read More
  • Research News

    Foundational Step Shows Quantum Computers Can Be Better Than the Sum of Their Parts

    Pobody’s nerfect—not even the indifferent, calculating bits that are the foundation of computers. But College Park Professor Christopher Monroe’s group, together with colleagues from Duke University, have made progress toward ensuring we can trust the results of quantum computers(link is external) even when they are Read More
  • Research News

    New Approach to Information Transfer Reaches Quantum Speed Limit

    Even though quantum computers are a young technology and aren’t yet ready for routine practical use, researchers have already been investigating the theoretical constraints that will bound quantum technologies. One of the things researchers have discovered is that there are limits to how quickly Read More
  • 1 Bilayer Graphene Inspires Two-Universe Cosmological Model
  • 2 New Perspective Blends Quantum and Classical to Understand Quantum Rates of Change
  • 3 Tug-of-War Unlocks Menagerie of Quantum Phases of Matter
  • 4 Enhancing Simulations of Curved Space with Qubits
  • 5 In a Smooth Move, Ions Ditch Disorder and Keep Their Memories
  • 6 Graphene’s Magic Act Relies on a Small Twist
  • 7 Novel Design May Boost Efficiency of On-Chip Frequency Combs
  • 8 Foundational Step Shows Quantum Computers Can Be Better Than the Sum of Their Parts
  • 9 New Approach to Information Transfer Reaches Quantum Speed Limit
  • Student Spotlight
  • Graduate Student Spotlight

When University of Maryland senior physics majors Ela Rockafellow and Kate Sturge entered the lecture hall of their honors math course freshman year, they quickly realized they were two of three women in a room of about 25 people.

All through high school, Rockafellow noticed how the number of women, gender minorities and students of color diminished in her advanced STEM classes, especially physics and math. When she asked her friends why their passion for science had faded, they told

Read More

Physics can sometimes come across as the business of cold, calculating geniuses. But it can often be joyful, fun, competitive, engaging and more. Physicists are normal people and each of them has a unique and evolving relationship with their discipline. 

University of Maryland physics graduate student Michael Winer has had a relationship with physics—and physics at UMD in particular—since he was a kid. He first came to UMD as a high school student pursuing his competitive spirit when physics was

Read More

Department News

  • May 6, 2022 Ott Elected to National Academy of Sciences Distinguished University Professor Edward Ott has been elected to the 2022 class of the National Academy of Sciences, one of 120 members and 30 international members recognized for their exceptional and continuing achievements in original research. Richard Walker from the Department of Geology was also chosen.   “I am thrilled that Dr. Read More
  • May 4, 2022 Lathrop and Colleagues Honored for Invention Professor Daniel Lathrop, geology Associate Professor Vedran Lekić and doctoral student Heidi Myers were honored with the Information Sciences Invention of the Year award at an at Innovate Maryland ceremony on May 3, 2022.  The Invention of the Year Awards have celebrated innovative campus research since 1987. Read More
  • Apr 6, 2022 Rockafellow, Yancey receive NSF Fellowships Ela Rockafellow and Colin Yancey were among 22 current students and recent alumni of the University of Maryland to receive prestigious National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowships, which recognize outstanding graduate students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Fourteen of these recipients were from Read More
  • Mar 31, 2022 Patrick Kim Named Goldwater Scholar Patrick Kim, a junior physics and electrical engineering double-degree student, is one of three UMD students to have been awarded 2022 scholarships by the Barry Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Foundation, which encourages students to pursue advanced study and research careers in the sciences, engineering Read More
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Upcoming Events

19 May
IQC-QuICS Math-CS Seminar: Sevag Gharibian
Date Thu, May 19, 2022 10:00 am - 11:00 am
20 May
Master's Thesis Defense: Amin Shiraz Gilani
Fri, May 20, 2022 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
13 Jun
EPT Seminar
Mon, Jun 13, 2022 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm
6 Jul
QuICS Seminar: David Arvidsson-Shukur
Wed, Jul 6, 2022 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
6 Sep
Physics Colloquium
Tue, Sep 6, 2022 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm